(Extra) Green Goddess Dip

Hi there, world!  I haven’t posted anything in quite a bit because I’ve been in graduate school, a completely rewarding and eye-opening experience that also unfortunately ate all of my free time.  I spent an intense year studying public health and more specifically, nutrition and food access. My interests in sustainability, food production, and overconsumption were piqued even more this past year, so I plan to post in the coming months about some of the fascinating topics I researched.

Now that I’m back to real life and have more time to spend in the kitchen, I decided to perfect a dip recipe that would be tasty with fresh vegetables.  I’ve come across many green goddess dip recipes over the years, but wanted to make one that packed in as much greenery as possible, and swapped out much of the mayonnaise for greek yogurt.  It’s easy to make a batch to divide into several small containers to take to work and one larger one to keep at home.  

Ingredients:

½ cup parsley

½ cup chives

½ cup dill

1 cup fresh spinach leaves (or ¾ cup frozen spinach)

¼ cup mayonnaise

1 cup lowfat Greek yogurt

1 tsp. Lemon juice

1 anchovy (or 1 teaspoon anchovy paste)*

5 turns freshly ground pepper

Generous pinch of salt

 

Prepare the herbs by washing them all thoroughly.  A colander and lightly flowing cool water usually works best, but really get in there and move the leaves around because they can be gritty and dirty.  Dry the herbs on a clean kitchen towel. For the parsley and dill, pull off the leaves/fronds and discard the stems.  For the chives, just trim any dingy-looky ends.  Put all of the prepared herbs into a food processor fitted with a regular blade.  Wash and drain the spinach and add that to the food processor.  Pulse to blend into a rough chop.  FInally, add the other ingredients and blend again until smooth.

Serve with fresh vegetables or chips for dipping.  You can also use it as a salad dressing.

 

* Don’t be weirded out –try it!  It won’t taste fishy at all, it simply adds a salty and umami flavor.  And, anchovies are the secret ingredient in delicious foods you love like caesar dressing and puttanesca sauce too, so you might as well keep a tube of it in the fridge!

 

Friday Favorite: Tolerant Lentil Pasta

I love me some pasta.  Picture the Cookie Monster going to town on some chocolate chip cookies, and that’s pretty much me every time I’m around macaroni and cheese or spaghetti pomodoro.  It’s delicious, filling, and works with all kinds of sauces as well as in soups and in casseroles.  So what’s a girl to do when trying to cut back on refined white flour?

There are a lot of gluten-free pasta options available.  Always read the ingredients on the back of the box so that you know exactly what it’s made from.  I was too naive the first few times I bought gluten-free pasta, only to get home and see that the pasta I had bought was made with corn or rice flour.  There’s nothing inherently wrong with those ingredients, but the rice pasta sat in my stomach like a rock, and the corn pasta came apart into a mushy mess when cooked.  I also tried a few brands of lentil pasta but it didn’t hold its shape and created a slimy foam when I cooked it.

Then one day I walked down the pasta aisle at the grocery store and a light from heaven shone down over a box of Tolerant brand red lentil penne.  Actually, it wasn’t that dramatic — my best friend recommended the brand to me.  But it did end up being a game changer.  NOTHING can really be a substitute for real pasta, so I recommend saving that for your favorite recipes. But for a quick and healthy (Lentils provide protein!) mid-week meal, throw together some Tolerant red lentil penne with marinara, or their green lentil elbow macaroni with pesto.  You can find it at most natural food grocery stores, or on Vitacost.com.  And skip the spiral shape kind which is too dense and hard.

 

Recipe: Cold Soba Noodle Salad with Vegetables

This noodle dish is like an Asian version of pasta primavera.  Just whole wheat noodles, fresh veggies, and a slightly IMG_4217tangy and savory dressing.  It’s great for leftovers because it’s meant to be eaten cold, and the flavors continue to meld together after day one.  You can substitute your favorite vegetables or whatever is in season — aim for a colorful mix!

 

Ingredients:
(4 servings)

8 oz. buckwheat soba noodles
1 small onion, peeled and cut into thin strips
2 cups broccoli, washed and chopped
1 cup bell peppers, washed and chopped
1 cup mushrooms, washed and sliced
1 cup summer squash, washed and sliced
1 tablespoon sesame oil
½ cup fresh cilantro leaves, washed and rough-chopped


Dressing:

1/4 cup rice vinegar
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon finely minced garlic
1/2 teaspoon chili flakes
1/2 teaspoon lime zest
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon oyster sauce

Directions:

Boil noodles according to package directions. Drain, toss with olive oil (so that it doesn’t stick together in a clump) and cool. In a large pan or dutch oven, heat sesame oil over medium heat.  Add the onions and vegetables.  Stir occasionally until the onions are translucent and the vegetables are just tender. Remove from heat and let cool.  Meanwhile, in a small bowl or pitcher, combine dressing ingredients and whisk together.  Mix noodles together with the vegetables, add the cilantro, and pour the dressing over all the ingredients. Toss together until the noodles are well coated.

Recipe: Kale Caesar Salad with Greek Yogurt Dressing

In the past few years it seems to be hail to the kale in grocery stores and on restaurant menus.  Kale salads are available everywhere from the trendy DC restaurant Lincoln to the WaWa before the Bay Bridge. And now kale chips are much more widely available than just at health food stores.  Maybe someday we’ll even see kale on the dollar menu at McDonalds!

My favorite way to enjoy kale is in a caesar salad.  Caesar salad is pretty standard on restaurant menus, and the traditional version with romaine lettuce is tasty, but kale has more health benefits than lettuce (it has more iron than even beef!).  I make kale caesars with lacinato kale — also sometimes called dinosaur or tuscan kale.   It is flat and smooth and I find it a lot easier to eat than curly kale which is completely unruly on your fork and makes you feel like a slob.  Kale is definitely tougher than lettuce but that’s why I think it’s complemented so well by caesar dressing, which is really creamy and flavorful.  I generously dress this salad, even though I’m usually a light-on-the-dressing girl, so that the flavor balances out the vegetal toughness of naked kale.  This dressing does not contain raw eggs, like a lot of caesar dressings.  It’s also made with greek yogurt to boost protein.  Don’t be intimidated by the anchovy paste.  They sell it in squeeze tubes in most grocery stores and it DOES NOT make the dressing fishy.  You won’t even know it’s in there.  Spoiler Alert: It’s the secret ingredient in every real caesar dressing.  Go crazy with toppings like radish slices, homemade croutons, hard-boiled eggs, or anything else!

 

Ingredients

1 large bunch Lacinato kale

Dressing:

¾ cup Parmesan cheese, grated
½ cup olive oil
¼ cup plain Greek yogurt
1 tbsp. red wine vinegar
1 tbsp. lemon juice/juice from a large lemon wedge
1 tsp.anchovy paste
1 tsp. Dijon mustard
1 garlic clove

Wash kale leaves thoroughly in a colander.  Especially organic kale can often contain little buggers, obviously, because it hasn’t been sprayed with pesticide.  But no thank you to eating those little guys.  Dry the kale thoroughly and tear out the stems.  Tear or chop the kale into bite-size pieces and put into a large bowl.

For the dressing, combine all ingredients in a mini-blender or food processor and blend until smooth.  spoon desired amount of dressing onto the kale and toss until fully combined.  It’s best to let the salad sit for a while after dressing it.  With most salads, the greens get soggy and wilted, but with tough kale you want the dressing to somewhat saturate the greens.

Note — You can keep the dressing in a container in the fridge for up to a week and a half and use it as needed on individual-size salads — these are great to take to work for lunch.

Recipe: Greeña Colada Smoothie

It’s 5 o’clock and 85 degrees somewhere… and because it is, I ignored the snowstorm outside yesterday and whipped up a green piña colada smoothie (virgin, because it was a pre-workout snack and nobody wants to be that girl who falls off the back of the treadmill).  This smoothie brings together the typical piña colada flavors with coconut oil (no, it doesn’t make the smoothie greasy, just adds to the taste), frozen pineapple chunks, banana to add creaminess and a squeeze of lime.  The greeña comes from kale — you can taste no hint of it and it’s a great way to add calcium and fiber to a smoothie.  Many tropical cocktail mixes are made with high fructose corn syrup, so this easy homemade alternative skips the over-processed additives in lieu of fresh, whole ingredients.

Ingredients:
½ frozen banana, cut into chunked
½ cup frozen pineapple chunks
1 ½ tsp. coconut oil
⅛ cup pineapple shavings (or coconut milk for a smoother drink)
1 large leaf of kale, stripped of the stem and torn into pieces
½ cup almond milk
squeeze of fresh lime

Put banana, pineapple, coconut oil and shavings, and kale into a blender and pulse until finely chopped.  Add the almond milk and blend until smooth.

P.S. – I totally thought that I came up with the name Greeña Colada, until I googled it and saw it’s already a thing.  Is this how Al Gore felt when the internet happened?